RSS

API Discovery News

These are the news items I've curated in my monitoring of the API space that have some relevance to the API definition conversation and I wanted to include in my research. I'm using all of these links to better understand how the space is testing their APIs, going beyond just monitoring and understand the details of each request and response.

Defining The Smallest Unit Possible For Use At API Runtime

I’m thinking a lot about what is needed at API runtime lately. How we document and provide machine readable definitions for APIs, and how we provide authentication, pricing, and even terms of service to help reduce friction. As Mike Amundsen (@mamund) puts it, to enable “find and bind”. This goes beyond simple API on-boarding, and getting started pages, and looks to make APIs executable within a single click, allowing us to put them to use as soon as we find them.

The most real world example of this in action can be found with the Run in Postman button, which won’t always deal with the business and politics of APIs at runtime, but will deal with just about everything else. Allowing API providers to publish Run in Postman Buttons, defined using a Postman Collection, which include authentication environment details, that API consumers can use to quickly fire up an API in a single click. One characteristic I’ve come across that contributes to Postman Collections being truly executable is that they reflect the small unit possible for use at API runtime.

You can see an example of this in action over at Peachtree Data, who like many other API providers have crafted Run in Postman buttons, but instead of doing this for the entire surface area of their API, they have done it for a single API path. Making the Run in Postman button much more precise, and executable. Taking it beyond just documentation, to actually being more of a API runtime executable artifact. This is a simple shift in how Postman Collections can be used, but a pretty significant one. Now instead of wading through all of Peachtree’s APIs in my Postman, I can just do an address cleanse, zip code lookup, or email validation–getting down to business in a single click.

This is an important aspect of on-boarding developers. I may not care about wading through and learning about all your APIs right now. I’m just looking for the API solution I need to a particular problem. Why clutter up my journey with a whole bunch of other resources? Just give me what I need, and get out of my way. Most other API providers I have looked at in Postman’s API Network have provided a single Run in Postman button for all of their APIs, where Peachtree has opted to provide many Run in Postman buttons for each of their APIs. Distinguishing themselves, and the value of each of their API resources in a pretty significant way.

I asked the questions the other week, regarding how big or how small is an API? I’m struggling with this question in my API stack work, as part of an investment by Streamdata.io to develop an API gallery. Do people want to find Amazon Web Services APIs? Amazon EC2 APIs? Or the single path for firing up an instance of EC2? What is the small unit of compute we should be documenting, generating OpenAPI and Postman Collections for? I feel like this is an important API discovery conversation to be having. I think depending on the circumstances, the answer will be different. It is a question I’ll keep asking in different scenarios, to help me better understand how I can document, publish, and make APIs not just more discoverable, but usable at runtime.


The Postman API Network

The Postman API Network is one of the recent movements in the API discovery space I’ve been working to get around to covering. As Postman continues its expansion from being just an API client, to a full lifecycle API development solution, they’ve added a network for discovering existing APIs that you can begin using within Postman in a single click. Postman Collections make it ridiculously easy to get up and running with an API. So easy, I’m confounded why ALL APIs aren’t publishing Postman Collections with Run in Postman Buttons published in their API docs.

The Postman API Network provides a catalog of APIs in over ten categories, with links to each API’s documentation. All of the APIs in the network have a Run in Postman button available as part of their documentation, which includes them in the Postman API Network. It is a pretty sensible approach to building a network of valuable APIs, who all have invested in there being a runtime-ready, machine readable Postman Collection for their APIs. One of the more interesting approaches I’ve seen introduced to help solve the API discovery problem in the eight years I’ve been doing API Evangelist.

I’ve been talking to Abhinav Asthana (@a85) about the Postman API Network, and working to understand how I can contribute, and help grow the catalog as part of my work as the API Evangelist. I’m a fan of Postman, and an advocate of it as an API lifecycle development solution, but I’m also really keen on bringing comprehensive API discovery solutions to the table. With the Postman API Network, and other API discovery solutions I’m seeing emerge recently, I’m finding renewed energy for this area of my work. Something I’ll be brainstorming and writing about more frequently in coming months.

Streamdata.io has been investing in me moving forward the API discovery conversation, to build out their vision of a Streamdata.io API Gallery, but also to contribute to the overall API discovery conversation. I’m in the middle of understanding how this aligns with my existing API Stack work, APIs.json and APIs.io effort, as well as with APIs.guru, AnyAPI, and the wider OpenAPI Initiative. If you have thoughts you’d like to share, feel free to ping me, and I’m happy to talk more about the API discovery, network, and run-time work I’m contributing to, and better understand how your work fits into the picture.


Thoughts On The Schema.Org WebAPI Type Extension

I’m putting some thought into the Schema.Org WebAPI Type Extension proposal by Mike Ralphson (Mermade Software) and Ivan Goncharov (APIs.guru), to “facilitate better automatic discovery of WebAPIs and associated machine and human-readable documentation”. It’s an interesting evolution in how we define APIs, in terms of API discovery, but I would also add potentially at “execute time”.

Here is what a base WebAPI type schema could look like:

{ "@context": "http://schema.org/", "@type": "WebAPI", "name": "Google Knowledge Graph Search API", "description": "The Knowledge Graph Search API lets you find entities in the Google Knowledge Graph. The API uses standard schema.org types and is compliant with the JSON-LD specification.", "documentation": "https://developers.google.com/knowledge-graph/", "termsOfService": "https://developers.google.com/knowledge-graph/terms", "provider": { "@type": "Organization", "name": "Google Inc." } }

Then the proposed extensions could include the following:

The webApiDefinitions (EntryPoint) contentType property contains a reference to one of the following conten types:

  • OpenAPI / Swagger in JSON - application/openapi+json or application/x-openapi+json
  • OpenAPI / Swagger in YAML - application/openapi
  • RAML - application/raml+yaml
  • API Blueprint in markdown - text/vnd.apiblueprint
  • API Blueprint parsed in JSON - application/vnd.refract.parse-result+json
  • API Blueprint parsed in YAML - application/vnd.refract.parse-result+yaml

Then the webApiActions property brings a handful of actions to the table, with the following being suggested:

  • apiAuthentication - Links to a resource detailing authentication requirements. Note this is a human-readable resource, not an authentication endpoint
  • apiClientRegistration - Links to a resource where a client may register to use the API
  • apiConsole - Links to an interactive console where API calls may be tested
  • apiPayment - Links to a resource detailing pricing details of the API

I fully support extending the Schema.org WebAPI vocabulary in this way. It adds all the bindings needed to make the WebAPI type executable at runtime, as well as it states at discovery time. I like the transport and protocol additions, helping ensure the WebAPI vocabulary is as robust as it possibly can. webApiDefinitions provides all the technical details regarding the surface area of the API we need to actually engage with it at runtime, and webApiActions begins to get at some of the business of APIs friction that exists at runtime. Making for an interesting vocabulary that can be used to describe web APIs, which also becomes more actionable by providing everything you need to get up and running.

The suggestions are well thought out and complete. If I was to add any elements, I’d say it also needs a support link. There will be contact information embedded within the API definitions, but having a direct link along with registration, documentation, terms of service, authentication, and payment would help out significantly. I would say that the content type to transport and protocol coverage is deficient a bit. Meaning you have SOAP, but not referencing WSDL. I know that there isn’t a direct definition covering every transport and protocol, but eventually it should be as comprehensive as it can. (ie. adding AsyncAPI, etc. in the future)

The WebAPI type extensions reflect what we have been trying to push forward with our APIs.json work, but comes at it from a different direction. I feel there are significant benefits to having all these details as part of the Schema.org vocabulary, expanding on what you can describe in a common way. Which can then also be used as part of each APIs requests, responses, and messages. I don’t see APIs.json as part of a formal vocabulary like this–I see it more as the agile format for indexing APIs that exist, and building versatile collections of APIs which could also contain a WebAPI reference.

I wish I had more constructive criticism or feedback, but I think it is a great first draft of suggestions for evolving the WebAPI type. There are other webApiActions properties I’d like to see based upon my APIs.json work, but I think this represents an excellent first step. There will be some fuzziness between documentation and apiConsole, as well as gaps in actionability between apiAuthentication, and apiClientRegistration–thinks like application creation (to get keys), and opportunities to have Github, Twitter, and other OpenID/OAuth authentication, but these things can be worked out down the road. Sadly there isn’t much standardization at this layer currently, and I see this extension as a first start towards making this happen. As I said, this is a good start, and we have lots of work ahead as we see more adoption.

Nice work Mike and Ivan! Let me know how I can continue to amplify and get the word out. We need to help make sure folks are describing their APIs using Schema.org. I’d love to be able to automate the discovery of APIs, using existing search engines and tooling–I know that you two would like to see this as well. API discovery is a huge problem, which there hasn’t been much movement on in the last decade, and having a common vocabulary that API providers can use to describe their APIs, which search engines can tune into would help move us further down the road when it comes to having more robust API discovery.


An Observable Industry Level Directory Of API Providers And Consumers

I’ve been breaking down the work on banking APIs coming out of Open Banking in the UK lately. I recently took all their OpenAPI definitions and published as a demo API developer portal. Bringing the definitions out of the shadows a little bit, and showing was is possible with the specification. Pushing the project forward some more today I published the Open Banking API Directory specification to the project, showing the surface area of the very interesting, and important component of open banking APIs in the UK.

The Open Banking Directory provides a pretty complete, albeit rough and technical approach to delivering observability for the UK banking industry API ecosystem actor layer. Everyone involved in the banking API ecosystem in UK has to be registered in the directory. It provides profiles of the banks, as well as any third party players. It really provides an unprecedented, industry level look at how you can make API ecosystems more transparent and observable. This thing doesn’t exist at the startup level because nobody wants to be open with the number of developers, or much else regarding the operation of their APIs. Making any single, or industry level API ecosystem, operate as black boxes–even if they claim to be an “open API”.

Could you imagine if API providers didn’t handle their own API management layer, and an industry level organization would handle the registration, certification, directory, and dispute resolution between API providers and API consumers? Could you imagine if we could see the entire directory of Facebook and Twitter developers, understand what businesses and individuals were behind the bots and other applications? Imagine if API providers couldn’t lie about the number of active developers, and we knew how many different APIs each application developers used? And it was all public data? An entirely different API landscape would exist, with entirely different incentive models around providing and consuming gAPIs.

The Open Banking Directory is an interesting precedent. It’s not just an observable API authentication and management layer. It also is an API. Making the whole thing something that can be baked into the industry level, as well as each individual application. I’m going to have to simmer on this concept some more. I’ve thought a lot about collective API developer and client solutions, but never anything like this. I’m curious to see how this plays out in a heavily regulated country and industry, but also eager to think about how something like this might work (or not) in government API circles, or even in the private sector, within smaller, less regulated industries.


What We Need To Be Machine Readable At API Run Time

I had breakfast with Mike Amundsen (@mamund) and Matt McLarty (@MattMcLartyBC) of the CA API Academy team this morning in midtown this morning. As we were sharing stories of what each other was working on, the topic of what is needed to execute an API call came up. Not the time consuming find an API, sign up for an account, figure out the terms of service and pricing version, but all of this condensed into something that can happen in a split second within applications and systems.

How do we distill down the essential ingredients of API consumption into a single, machine readable unit that can be automated into what Mike Amundsen calls, “find and bind”. This is something I’ve been thinking a lot about lately as I work on my API discovery research, and there are a handful of elements that need to be present:

  • Authentication - Having keys to be able to authentication.
  • Surface Area - What is the host, base url, path, headers, and parameters for a request.
  • Terms of Service - What are the legal terms of service for consumption.
  • Pricing - How much does each API request cost me?

We need these elements to be machine readable and easily accessible at discover and runtime. Currently the surface area of the API can be described using OpenAPI, that isn’t a problem. The authentication details can be included in this, but it means you already have to have an application setup, with keys. It doesn’t include new users into the equation, meaning, discovering, registering, and obtaining keys. I have a draft specification I call “API plans” for the pricing portion of it, but it is something that still needs a lot of work. So, in short, we are nowhere near having this layer ready for automation–which we will need to scale all of this API stuff.

This is all stuff I’ve been beating a drum about for years, and I anticipate it is a drum I’ll be beating for a number of more years before we see come into focus. I’m eager to see Mike’s prototype on “find and bind”, because it is the only automated, runtime, discovery, registration, and execute research I’ve come across that isn’t some proprietary magic. I’m going to be investing more cycles into my API plans research, as well as the terms of service stuff I started way back when alongside my API Commons project. Hopefully, moving all this forward another inch or two.


What Is The Streamdata.io API Gallery?

As I prepare to launch the Streamdata.io API Gallery, I am doing a handful of presentations to partners. As part of this process I am looking to distill down the objectives behind the gallery, and the opportunity it delivers to just a handful of talking points I can include in a single slide deck. Of course, as the API Evangelist, the way I do this is by crafting a story here on the blog. To help me frame the conversation, and get to the core of what I needed to present, I wanted to just ask a couple questions, so that I can answer them in my presentation.

What is the Streamdata.io API Gallery? It is a machine readable, continuously deployed collection of OpenAPI definitions, indexed used APIs.json, with a user friendly user interface which allows for the browsing, searching, and filtering of individual APIs that deliver value within specific industries and topical areas.

What are we looking to accomplish with the Streamdata.io API Gallery? Discover and map out interesting and valuable API resources, then quantify what value they bring to the table while also ranking, categorizing, and making them available in a search engine friendly way that allows potential Streamdata.io customers to discover and understand what is possible.

What is the opportunity around the Streamdata.io API Gallery? Identify the best of breed APIs out there, and break down the topics that they deliver within, while also quantifying the publish and subscribe opportunities available–mapping out the event-driven opportunity that has already begun to emerge, while demonstrating Streamdata.io’s role in helping get existing API providers from where they are today, to where they need to be tomorrow.

Why is this relevant to Streamdata.io, and their road map? It provides a wealth of research that Streamdata.io can use to understand the API landscape, and feed it’s own sales and marketing strategy, but doing it in a way that generates valuable search engine and social media exhaust which potential customers might possibly find interesting, bringing them new API consumers, while also opening their eyes up to the event-driven opportunity that exists out there.

Distilling Things Down A Bit More Ok, that answers the general questions about what the Streamdata.io API Gallery is, and why we are building it. Now I want to distill down a little bit more to help me articulate the gallery as part of a series of presentations, existing as just a handful of bullet points. Helping get the point across in hopefully 60 seconds or less.

  • What is the Streamdata.io API Gallery?
    • API directory, for finding individual units of compute within specific topics.
    • OpenAPI (fka Swagger) driven, making each unit of value usable at run-time.
    • APIs.json indexed, making the collections of resources easy to search and use.
    • Github hosted, making it forkable and continuously deployable and integrate(able).
  • Why is the Streamdata.io Gallery relevant?
    • It maps out the API universe with an emphasis on the value each individual API path possesses.
    • Categories, tags, and indexes APIs into collections which are published to Github.
    • Provides a human and machine friendly view of the existing publish and subscribe landscape.
    • Begins to organize the API universe in context of a real time event-driven messaging world.
  • What is the opportunity around the Streamdata.io API Gallery?
    • Redefining the API landscape from an event-driven perspective.
    • Quantify, qualify, and rank APIs to understand what is the most interesting and highest quality.
    • Help API providers realize events occurring via their existing platforms.
    • Begin moving beyond a request and response model to an event-driven reality.

There is definitely a lot more going on within the Streamdata.io API Gallery, but I think this captures the essence of what we are trying to achieve. A lot of what we’ve done is building upon my existing API Stack work, where I have worked to profile and index public APIs using OpenAPI and APIs.json, but this round of work is taking things to a new level. With API Stack I ended up with lists of companies and organizations, each possessing a list of APIs. The Streamdata.io API Gallery is a list of API resources, broken down by the unit of value they bring to the table, which is further defined by whether it is a GET, POST, or PUT–essentially a publish or subscribe opportunity.

Additionally, I am finally finding traction with the API rating system(s) I have been developing for the last five years. Profiling and measuring the companies behind the APIs I’m profiling, and making this knowledge available not just at discover time, but potentially at event and run time. Basically being able to understand the value of an event when it happens in real time, and be able to make programmatic decisions regarding whether we care about the particular event or not. Eventually, allowing us to subscribe only to the events that truly matter to us, and are of the highest value–then tuning out the rest. Delivering API ratings in an increasingly crowded and noisy event-driven API landscape.

We have the prototype for the Streamdata.io API Gallery ready to go. We are still adding APIs, and refining how they are tagged and organized. The rating system is very basic right now, but we will be lighting up different dimensions of the rating(s) algorithm, and hopefully delivering on different angles of how we quantify the value of events that occurring. I’m guessing we will be doing a soft launch in the next couple of weeks to little fanfare, and it will be something that builds, and evolves over time as the API index gets refined and used more heavily.


The Importance of the API Path Summary, Description, and Tags in an OpenAPI Definition

I am creating a lot of OpenAPI definitions right now. Streamdata.io is investing in me pushing forward my API Stack work, where I profile API using OpenAPI, and index their operations using APIs.json. From the resulting indexes, we are building out the Streamdata.io API Gallery, which shows the possibilities of providing streaming APIs on top of existing web APIs available across the landscape. The OpenAPI definitions I’m creating aren’t 100% complete, but they are “good enough” for what we are needing to do with them, and are allowing me to catalog a variety of interesting APIs, and automate the proxying of them using Streamdata.io.

I’m finding the most important part of doing this work is making sure there is a rich summary, description, and set of tags for each API. While the actual path, parameters, and security definitions are crucial to programmatically executing the API, the summary, description, and tags are essential so that I can understand what the API does, and make it discoverable. As I list out different areas of my API Stack research, like the financial market data APIs, it is critical that I have a title, and description for each provider, but the summary, description, and tags are what provides the heart of the index for what is possible with each API.

When designing an API, as a developer, I tend to just fly through writing summary, descriptions, and tags for my APIs. I’m focused on the technical details, not this “fluff”. However, this represents one of the biggest disconnects in the API lifecycle, where the developer is so absorbed with the technical details, we forget, neglect, or just don’t are to articulate what we are doing to other humans. The summary, description, and tags are the outlines in the API contract we are providing. These details are much more than just the fluff for the API documentation. They actually describe the value being delivered, and allow this value to be communicated, and discovered throughout the life of an API–they are extremely important.

As I’m doing this work, I realize just how important these descriptions and tags are to the future of these APIs. Whenever it makes sense I’m translating these APIs into streaming APIs, and I’m taking the tags I’ve created and using them to define the events, topics, and messages that are being transacted via the API I’m profiling. I’m quantifying how real time these APIs are, and mapping out the meaningful events that are occurring. This represents the event-driven shift we are seeing emerge across the API landscape in 2018. However, I’m doing this on top of API providers who may not be aware of this shift in how the business of APIs is getting done, and are just working hard on their current request / response API strategy. These summaries, descriptions, and tags, represent how we are going to begin mapping out the future that is happening around them, and begin to craft a road map that they can use to understand how they can keep evolving, and remain competitive.


The Growing Importance of Github Topics For Your API SEO

When you are operating an API, you are always looking for new ways to be discovered. I study this aspect of operating APIs from the flip-side–how do I find new APIs, and stay in tune with what APIs are to? Historically we find APIs using ProgrammableWeb, Google, and Twitter, but increasingly Github is where I find the newest, coolest APIs. I do a lot of searching via Github for API related topics, but increasingly Github topics themselves are becoming more valuable within search engine indexes, making them an easy way to uncover interesting APIs.

I was profiling the market data API Alpha Vantage today, and one of the things I always do when I am profiling an API, is I conduct a Google, and then secondarily, a Github search for the APIs name. Interestingly, I found a list of Github Topics while Googling for Alpha Vantage API, uncovering some interesting SDKs, CLI, and other open source solutions that have been built on top of the financial data API. Showing the importance of operating your API on Github, but also working to define a set of standard Github Topic tags across all your projects, and helping encourage your API community to use the same set of tags, so that their projects will surface as well.

I consider Github to be the most important tool in an API providers toolbox these days. I know as an API analyst, it is where I learn the most about what is really going on. It is where I find the most meaningful signals that allow me to cut through the noise that exists on Google, Twitter, and other channels. Github isn’t just for code. As I mention regularly, 100% of my work as API Evangelist lives within hundreds of separate Github repositories. Sadly, I don’t spend as much time as I should tagging, and organizing projects into meaningful topic areas, but it is something I’m going to be investing in more. Conveniently, I’m doing a lot of profiling of APIs for my partner Streamdata.io, which involves establishing meaningful tags for use in defining real time data stream topics that consumers can subscribe to–making me think a little more about the role Github topics can play.

One of these days I will do a fresh roundup of the many ways in which Github can be used as part of API operations. I’m trying to curate and write stories about everything I come across while doing my work. The problem is there isn’t a single place I can send my readers to when it comes to applying this wealth of knowledge to their operations. The first step is probably to publish Github as its own research area on Github (mind blown), as I do with my other projects. It has definitely risen up in importance, and can stand on its own feet alongside the other areas of my work. Github plays a central role in almost every stop along the API life cycle, and deserves its own landing page when it comes to my API research, and priority when it comes to helping API providers understanding what they should be doing on the platform to help make their API operations more successful.


You Have to Know Where All Your APIs Are Before You Can Deliver On API Governance

I wrote an earlier article that basic API design guidelines are your first step towards API governance, but I wanted to introduce another first step you should be taking even before basic API design guides–cataloging all of your APIs. I’m regularly surprised by the number of companies I’m talking with who don’t even know where all of their APIs are. Sometimes, but not always, there is some sort of API directory or catalog in place, but often times it is out of date, and people just aren’t registering their APIs, or following any common approach to delivering APIs within an organization–hence the need for API governance.

My recommendation is that even before you start thinking about what your governance will look like, or even mention the word to anyone, you take inventory of what is already happening. Develop an org chart, and begin having conversations. Identify EVERYONE who is developing APIs, and start tracking on how they are doing what they do. Sure, you want to get an inventory of all the APIs each individual or team is developing or operating, but you should also be documenting all the tooling, services, and processes they employ as part of their workflow. Ideally, there is some sort of continuous deployment workflow in place, but this isn’t a reality in many of the organization I work with, so mapping out how things get done is often the first order of business.

One of the biggest failures of API governance I see is that the strategy has no plan for how we get from where we are to where we ant to be, it simply focuses on where we want to be. This type of approach contributes significantly to pissing people off right out of the gate, making API governance a lot more difficult. Stop focusing on where you want to be for a moment, and focus on where you are. Build a map of where people are, tools, services, skills, best and worst practices. Develop a comprehensive map of where organization is today, and then sit down with all stakeholders to evaluate what can be improved upon, and streamlined. Beginning the hard work of building a bridge between your existing teams and what might end up being a future API governance strategy.

API design is definitely the first logical step of your API governance strategy, standardizing how you design your APIs, but this shouldn’t be developed from the outside-in. It should be developed from what already exists within your organization, and then begin mapping to healthy API design practices from across the industry. Make sure you are involving everyone you’ve reached out to as part of inventory of APIs, tools, services, and people. Make sure they have a voice in crafting that first draft of API design guidelines you bring to the table. Without buy-in from everyone involved, you are going to have a much harder time ever reaching the point where you can call what you are doing governance, let alone seeing the results you desire across your API operations.


I Created An OpenAPI For The Hashicorp Consul API

I was needing an OpenAPI (fka Swagger) definition for the Hashicorp Consul API, so that I could use in a federal government project I’m advising on. We are using the solution for the microservices discovery layer, and I wanted to be able to automate using the Consul API, publish documentation within our project Github, import into Postman across the team, as well as several other aspects of API operations. I’m working to assemble at least a first draft OpenAPI for the entire technology stack we’ve opted to use for this project.

First thing I did was Google, “Consul API OpenAPI”, then “Consul API Swagger”, which didn’t yield any results. Then I Githubbed “Consul API Swagger”, and came across a Github Issue where a user had asked for “improved API documentation”. The resulting response from Hashicorp was, “we just finished a revamp of the API docs and we don’t have plans to support Swagger at this time.” Demonstrating they really don’t understand what OpenAPI (fka Swagger) is, something I’ll write about in future stories this week.

One of the users on the thread had created an API Blueprint for the Consul API, and published the resulting documentation to Apiary. Since I wanted an OpenAPI, instead of an API Blueprint, I headed over to APIMATIC API Transformer to see if I could get the job done. After trying to transform the API Blueprint to OpenAPI 2.0 I got some errors, which forced to me to spend some time this weekend trying to hand-craft / scrape the static API docs and publish my own OpenAPI. The process was so frustrating I ended up pausing the work, and writing two blog posts about my experiences, and then this morning I received an email from the APIMATIC team that they caught the errors, updated the API Blueprint, allowing me to continue transforming it into an OpenAPI definition. Benefits of being the API Evangelist? No, benefits of using APIMATIC!

Anyways, you can find the resulting OpenAPI on Github. I will be refining it as I use in my project. Ideally, Hashicorp would take ownership of their own OpenAPI, providing a machine readable API definition that consumers could use in tooling, and other services. However, they are stuck where many other API service providers, API providers, and API consumers are–thinking OpenAPI is still Swagger, which is just about API documentation. ;-( . I try not to let this frustrate me, and will write about it each time I come across, until things change. OpenAPI (fka Swagger) is so much more than just API documentation, and is such an enabler for me as an API consumer when I’m getting up and running with a project. If you are doing APIs, please take the time to understand what it is, it is something that could be the difference between me using our API, or moving on to find another solution. It is that much of a timesaver for me.


API Discovery Is Mostly About You Sharing Stories About The APIs You Use

I do a lot of thinking about API discovery, and how I can help people find the APIs they need. As part of this thinking I’m always curious why API discovery hasn’t evolved much in the last decade. You know, no Google for APIs. No magical AI, ML, AR, VR, or Blockchain for distributed API mining. As I’m thinking, I ask myself, “how is it that the API Evangelist finds most of his APIs?” Well, word of mouth. Storytelling. People talking about the APIs they are using to solve a real world business problem.

That is it! API storytelling is API discovery. If people aren’t talking about your API, it is unlikely it will be found. Sure people still need to be able to Google for solutions, but really that is just Googling, not API discovery. It is likely they are just looking for a company that does what they need, and the API is a given. We really aren’t going to discover new APIs. I don’t know many people who spend time looking for new APIs (except me, and I have a problem). People are going to discover new APIs by hearing about what other people are using, through storytelling on the web and in person.

In my experience as the API Evangelist I see three forms of this in action:

1) APIs talking about their API use cases on their blog 2) Companies telling stories about their infrastructure on their blog 3) Individuals telling stories about the APIs they use in job, side projects, and elsewhere.

This represent the majority of ways in which I discover new APIs. Sure, as the API Evangelist I will discover new APIs occasionally by scouring Github, Googling, and harvesting social media, but I am an analyst. These three ways will be how the average person discovers new APIs. Which means, if you want your API to be discovered, you need to be telling stories about it. If you want the APIs you depend on to be successful and find new users, you need to be telling stories about it.

Sometimes in all of this techno hustle, good old fashioned storytelling is the most important tool in our toolbox. I’m sure we’ll keep seeing waves of API directories, search engines, and brain wave neural networks emerge to help us find APIs over the next couple of years. However, I’m predicting that API discovery will continue to be defined by human beings talking to each other, telling stories on their blogs, via social media, and occasionally through brain interfaces.


API Discovery Will Be About Finding Companies Who Do What You Need And API Is Assumed

While I’m still investing in defining the API discovery space, and I’m seeing some improvements from other API service and tooling providers when it comes to finding, sharing, indexing, and publishing API definitions, I honestly don’t think in the end API discovery will ever be a top-level concern. While API design, deployment, management, and even testing and monitoring have floated to the top as primary discussion areas for API providers, and consumers, the area of API discovery never has quite become a priority. There is always lots of talk about API discovery, mostly about what is broken, rarely about what is needed to fix, with regular waves of directories, marketplaces, and search solutions emerging to attempting to fix the problem, but always falling short.

As I watch more mainstream businesses on-board with the world of APIs, and banks, healthcare, insurance, automobile, and other staple industries work to find their way forward, I’m thinking that the mainstreamification of APIs will surpass API discovery. Meaning that people will be looking for companies who do the thing that they want, and that API is just assumed. Every business will need to have an API, just like every business is assumed to have an website. Sure there will be search engines, directories, and marketplaces to help us find what we are looking for, but when we just won’t always be looking for APIs, we will be looking for solutions. The presence of an API be will be assumed, and if it doesn’t exist we will move on looking for other companies, organizations, institutions, and agencies who do what we need.

I feel like this is one of the reasons API discovery really became a thing. It doesn’t need to be. If you are selling products and services online you need a website, and as the web has matured, you need the same data, content, media, and algorithms available in a machine readable format so they can be distributed to other websites, used within a variety of mobile applications, and available in voice, bot, device, and other applications. This is just how things will work. Developers won’t be searching for APIs, they’ll be searching for the solution to their problem, and the API is just one of the features that have to be present for them to actually become a customer. I’ll keep working to evolve my APIs.json discovery format, and incentivize the development of client, IDE, CI/CD, and other tooling, but I think these things will always be enablers, and not ever a primary concern in the API lifecycle.


OpenAPI 3.0 Tooling Discovery On Github And Social Media

I’ve been setting aside time to browse through and explore tagged projects on Github each week, learning about what is new and trending out there on the Githubz. It is a great way to explore what is being built, and what is getting traction with users. You have to wade through a lot of useless stuff, but when I come across the gems it is always worth it. I’ve been providing guidance to all my customers that they should be publishing their projects to Github, as well as tagging them coherently, so that they come up as part of tagged searches via the Github website, and the API (I do a lot of discovery via the API).

When I am browsing API projects on Github I usually have a couple of orgs and users I tend to peek in on, and my friend Mike Ralphson (@PermittedSoc) is always one. Except, I usually don’t have to remember to peek in on Mike’s work, because he is really good at tagging his work, and building interesting projects, so his stuff is usually coming up as I’m browsing tags. He is the first repository I’ve come across that is organizing OpenAPI 3.0 tooling, and on his project he has some great advice for project owners: “Why not make your project discoverable by using the topic openapi3 on GitHub and using the hashtag #openapi3 on social media?” « Great advice Mike!!

As I said, I regularly monitor Github tags, and I also monitor a variety of hashtags on Twitter for API chatter. If you aren’t tagging your projects, and Tweeting them out with appropriate hashtags, the likelihood they are going to be found decreases pretty significantly. This is how Mike will find your OpenAPI 3.0 tooling for inclusion in his catalog, and it is how I will find your project for inclusion in stories via API Evangelist. It’s a pretty basic thing, but it is one that I know many of you are overlooking because you are down in the weeds working on your project, and even when you come up for air, you probably aren’t always thinking about self-promotion (you’re not a narcissist like me, or are you?)

Twitter #hashtags has long been a discovery mechanism on social media, but the tagging on Github is quickly picking up steam when it comes to coding project discovery. Also, with the myriad of ways in which Github repos are being used beyond code, Github tagging makes it a discovery tool in general. When you consider how API providers are publishing their API portals, documentation, SDKs, definitions, schema, guides, and much more, it makes Github one of the most important API discovery tools out there, moving well beyond what ProgrammableWeb or Google brings to the table. I’ll continue to turn up the volume on what is possible with Github, as it is no secret that I’m a fan. Everything I do runs on Github, from my website, to my APIs, and supporting tooling–making it a pretty critical part of what I do in the API sector.


Cloud Marketplace Becoming The New Wholesale API Discovery Platform

I’m keeping an eye on the AWS Marketplace, as well as what Azure and Google are up to, looking for growing signs of anything API. I’d have to say that, while Azure is in close second, that AWS is growing faster when it comes to the availability of APIs in their marketplace. What I find interesting about this growth is it isn’t just about the cloud, it is about wholesale APIs, and as it grows it quickly becomes about API discovery as well.

The API conversation on AWS Marketplace has for a while been dominated by API service providers, and specifically the API management providers who have pioneered the space:

After management, we see some of the familiar faces from the API space doing API aggregation, database to API deployment, security, integration platform as a service (iPaaS), real time, logging, authentication, and monitoring with Runscope.

All rounding off the API lifecycle, providing a growing number of tools that API provides can deploy into their existing AWS infrastructure to help manage API operations. This is how API providers should be operating, offering retail SaaS versions of their APIs, but also cloud deployable, wholesale versions of their offerings that run in any cloud, not just AWS.

The portion of this aspect of API operations that is capturing my attention is the individual API providers are moving to offer their API up via AWS marketplace, moving things beyond just API service providers selling their tools to the space. Most notably are the API rockstars from the space:

After these well known API providers there are a handful of other companies offering up wholesale editions of their APIs, so that potential customers can bake into their existing infrastructure, alongside their own APIs, or possibly other 3rd party APIs.

These APIs are offering a variety of services but real quick I noticed location, machine learning, video editing, PDFs, health care, payments, sms, and other API driven solutions. It is a pretty impressive start to what I see as the future of API discovery and deployment, as well as any other stop along the lifecycle with all the API service providers offering their warez in the marketplace.

I’m going to setup a monitoring script to alert me of any new API focused additions to the AWS marketplace, using of course, the AWS Marketplace API. I’ve seen enough growth here to warrant the extra work, and added monitoring channel. I’m feeling like this will grow beyond my earlier thoughts about wholesale API deployment, and potentially pushing forward the API discovery conversation, and changing how we will be finding the APIs we use across our infrastructure. I will also keep an eye on Azure and Google in this area, as well as startup players like Algorithmia who are specializing in areas like machine learning and artificial intelligence.


Link Relation Types for APIs

I have been reading through a number of specifications lately, trying to get more up to speed on what standards are available for me to choose from when designing APIs. Next up on my list is Link Relation Types for Web Services, by Erik Wilde. I wanted to take this informational specification and repost here on my site, partially because I find it easier to read, and the process of breaking things down and publishing as a posts helps me digest the specification and absorb more of what it contains.

I’m particularly interested in this one, because Erik captures what I’ve had in my head for APIs.json property types, but haven’t been able to always articulate as well as Erik does, let alone published as an official specification. I think his argument captures the challenge we face with mapping out the structure we have, and how we can balance the web with the API, making sure as much of it becomes machine readable as possible. I’ve grabbed the meat of Link Relation Types for Web Services and pasted here, so I can break down, and reference across my storytelling.


  1. Introduction One of the defining aspects of the Web is that it is possible to interact with Web resources without any prior knowledge of the specifics of the resource. Following Web Architecture by using URIs, HTTP, and media types, the Web’s uniform interface allows interactions with resources without the more complex binding procedures of other approaches.

Many resources on the Web are provided as part of a set of resources that are referred to as a “Web Service” or a “Web API”. In many cases, these services or APIs are defined and managed as a whole, and it may be desirable for clients to be able to discover this service information.

Service information can be broadly separated into two categories: One category is primarily targeted for human users and often uses generic representations for human readable documents, such as HTML or PDF. The other category is structured information that follows some more formalized description model, and is primarily intended for consumption by machines, for example for tools and code libraries.

In the context of this memo, the human-oriented variant is referred to as “documentation”, and the machine-oriented variant is referred to as “description”.

These two categories are not necessarily mutually exclusive, as there are representations that have been proposed that are intended for both human consumption, and for interpretation by machine clients. In addition, a typical pattern for service documentation/description is that there is human-oriented high-level documentation that is intended to put a service in context and explain the general model, which is complemented by a machine-level description that is intended as a detailed technical description of the service. These two resources could be interlinked, but since they are intended for different audiences, it can make sense to provide entry points for both of them.

This memo places no constraints on the specific representations used for either of those two categories. It simply allows providers of aWeb service to make the documentation and/or the description of their services discoverable, and defines two link relations that serve that purpose.

In addition, this memo defines a link relation that allows providers of a Web service to link to a resource that represents status information about the service. This information often represents operational information that allows service consumers to retrieve information about “service health” and related issues.

  1. Terminology The key words “MUST”, “MUST NOT”, “REQUIRED”, “SHALL”, “SHALL NOT”,”SHOULD”, “SHOULD NOT”, “RECOMMENDED”, “MAY”, and “OPTIONAL” in this document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].

  2. Web Services “Web Services” or “Web APIs” (sometimes also referred to as “HTTP API” or “REST API”) are a way to expose information and services on the Web. Following the principles of Web architecture[ they expose URI-identified resources, which are then accessed and transferred using a specific representation. Many services use representations that contain links, and often these links are typed links.

Using typed links, resources can identify relationship types to other resources. RFC 5988 [RFC5988] establishes a framework of registered link relation types, which are identified by simple strings and registered in an IANA registry. Any resource that supports typed links according to RFC 5988 can then use these identifiers to represent resource relationships on the Web without having to re-invent registered relation types.

In recent years, Web services as well as their documentation and description languages have gained popularity, due to the general popularity of the Web as a platform for providing information and services. However, the design of documentation and description languages varies with a number of factors, such as the general application domain, the preferred application data model, and the preferred approach for exposing services.

This specification allows service providers to use a unified way to link to service documentation and/or description. This link should not make any assumptions about the provided type of documentation and/or description, so that service providers can choose the ones that best fit their services and needs.

3.1. Documenting Web Services In the context of this specification, “documentation” refers to information that is primarily intended for human consumption.Typical representations for this kind of documentation are HTML andPDF. Documentation is often structured, but the exact kind of structure depends on the structure of the service that is documented, as well as on the specific way in which the documentation authors choose to document it.

3.2. Describing Web Services In the context of this specification, “description” refers to information that is primarily intended for machine consumption.Typical representations for this are dictated by the technology underlying the service itself, which means that in today’s technology landscape, description formats exist that are based on XML, JSON, RDF, and a variety of other structured data models. Also, in each of those technologies, there may be a variety of languages that a redefined to achieve the same general purpose of describing a Web service.

Descriptions are always structured, but the structuring principles depend on the nature of the described service. For example, one of the earlier service description approaches, the Web ServicesDescription Language (WSDL), uses “operations” as its core concept, which are essentially identical to function calls, because the underlying model is based on that of the Remote Procedure Call (RPC) model. Other description languages for non-RPC approaches to services will use different structuring approaches.

3.3. Unified Documentation/Description If service providers use an approach where there is no distinction of service documentation Section 3.1 and service descriptionSection 3.2, then they may not feel the need to use two separate links. In such a case, an alternative approach is to use the”service” link relation type, which has no indication of whether it links to documentation or description, and thus may be better fit if no such differentiation is required.

  1. Link Relations for Web Services In order to allow Web services to represent the relation of individual resources to service documentation or description, this specification introduces and registers two new link relation types.

4.1. The service-doc Link Relation Type The “service-doc” link relation type is used to represent the fact that a resource is part of a bigger set of resources that are documented at a specific URI. The target resource is expected to provide documentation that is primarily intended for human consumption.

4.2. The service-desc Link Relation Type The “service-desc” link relation type is used to represent the fact that a resource is part of a bigger set of resources that are described at a specific URI. The target resource is expected to provide a service description that is primarily intended for machine consumption. In many cases, it is provided in a representation that is consumed by tools, code libraries, or similar components.

  1. Web Service Status Resources Web services providing access to a set of resources often are hosted and operated in an environment for which status information may be available. This information may be as simple as confirming that a service is operational, or may provide additional information about different aspects of a service, and/or a history of status information, possibly listing incidents and their resolution.

The “status” link relation type can be used to link to such a status resource, allowing service consumers to retrieve status information about a Web service’s status. Such a link may not be available from all resources provided by a Web service, but from key resources such as a Web service’s home resource.

This memo does not restrict the representation of a status resource in any way. It may be primarily focused on human or machine consumption, or a combination of both. It may be a simple “traffic light” indicator for service health, or a more sophisticated representation conveying more detailed information such as service subsystems and/or a status history.

  1. IANA Considerations The link relation types below have been registered by IANA perSection 6.2.1 of RFC 5988 [RFC5988]:

6.1. Link Relation Type: service-doc

Relation Name: service-doc
Description: Linking to service documentation that is primarily intended for human
consumption.
Reference: [[ This document ]]

6.2. Link Relation Type: service-desc

Relation Name: service-desc
Description: Linking to service description that is primarily intended for consumption by machines.
Reference: [[ This document ]]

6.3. Link Relation Type: status

Relation Name: status
Description: Linking to a resource that represents the status of a Web service or API.
Reference: [[ This document ]]


Adding Some Of My Own Thoughts Beyond The Specification This specification provides a more coherent service-doc, and service-desc that I think we did with humanURL, and support for multiple API definition formats (swagger, api blueprint, raml) as properties for any API. This specification provides a clear solution for human consumption, as well as one intended for consumption by machines. Another interesting link relation it provides is status, helping articulate the current state of an API.

It makes me happy to see this specification pushing forward and formalizing the conversation. I see the evolution of link relations for APIs as an important part of the API discovery and definition conversations in coming years. Processing this specification has helped jumpstart some conversation around APIs.json, as well as other specifications like JSON Home and Pivio.

Thanks for letting me build on your work Erik! - I am looking forward to contributing.


Embeddable API Tooling Discovery With JSON Home

I have been studying JSON Home, trying to understand how it sizes up to APIs.json, and other formats I’m tracking on like Pivio. JSON Home has a number of interesting features, and I thought one of their examples was also interesting, and was relevant to my API embeddable research. In this example, JSON Home was describing a widget that was putting an API to use as part of its operation.

Here is the snippet from the JSON Home example, providing all details of how it works:

JSON Home seems very action oriented. Everything about the format leads you towards taking some sort of API driven action, something that makes a lot of sense when it comes to widgets and other embeddables. I could see JSON Home being used as some sort of definition for button or widget generation and building tooling, providing a machine readable definition for the embeddable tool, and what is possible with the API(s) behind.

I’ve been working towards embeddable directories and API stacks using APIs.json, providing distributed and embeddable tooling that API providers and consumers can publish anywhere. I will be spending more time thinking about how this world of API discovery can overlap with the world of API embeddables, providing not just a directory of buttons, badges, and widgets, but one that describes what is possible when you engage with any embeddable tool. I’m beginning to see JSON Home similar to how I see Postman Collections, something that is closer to runtime, or at least deploy time. Where APIs.json is much more about indexing, search, and discovery–maybe some detail about where the widgets are, or maybe more detail about what embeddable resources are available.


API Discovery Using JSON Home

I’m have finally dedicated some time to learning more about Home Documents for HTTP APIs, or simply JSON Home. I see JSON Home as a nice way to bring together the technical components for an API, very similar to what I’ve been trying to accomplish with APIs.json. One of the biggest differences I see is that I’d say APIs.json was born out of the world of open data and APIs, where JSON Home is born of the web (which actually makes better sense).

I think the JSON Home description captures the specifications origins very well:

The Web itself offers one way to address these issues, using links [RFC3986] to navigate between states. A link-driven application discovers relevant resources at run time, using a shared vocabulary of link relations [RFC5988] and internet media types [RFC6838] to support a “follow your nose” style of interaction - just as a Web browser does to navigate the Web.

JSON Home provides any potential client with a machine readable set of instructions it can follow, involving one, or many APIs–providing a starting page for APIs which also enables:

  • Extensibility - Because new server capabilities can be expressed as link relations, new features can be layered in without introducing a new API version; clients will discover them in the home document.
  • Evolvability - Likewise, interfaces can change gradually by introducing a new link relation and/or format while still supporting the old ones.
  • Customisation - Home documents can be tailored for the client, allowing different classes of service or different client permissions to be exposed naturally.
  • Flexible deployment - Since URLs aren’t baked into documentation, the server can choose what URLs to use for a given service.

JSON Home, is a home page specification which uses JSON to provide APIs with a a launching point for the interactions they offer, by providing a coherent set links, all wrapped in a single machine readable index. Each JSON begins with a handful of values:

  • title - a string value indicating the name of the API
  • links - an object value, whose member names are link relation types [RFC5988], and values are URLs [RFC3986].
  • author - a suitable URL (e.g., mailto: or https:) for the author(s) of the API
  • describedBy - a link to documentation for the API
  • license - a link to the legal terms for using the API

Once you have the general details about the JSON Home API index, you can provide a collection of resource objects possessing links that can be indicated using an href property with a URI value, or template links which uses a URI template. Just like a list of links on a home page, but instead of a browser, it can be used in any client, for a variety of different purposes.

Each of the resources allow for resource hints, which allow clients to obtain relevant information about interacting with a resource beforehand, as a means of optimizing communications, as well as sharing which behaviors will be available for an API. Here are the default hints available for JSON Home:

  • allow - Hints the HTTP methods that the current client will be able to use to interact with the resource; equivalent to the Allow HTTP response header.
  • formats - Hints the representation types that the resource makes available, using the GET method.
  • accept-Patch - Hints the PATCH [RFC5789] request formats accepted by the resource for this client; equivalent to the Accept-Patch HTTP response header.
  • acceptPost - Hints the POST request formats accepted by the resource for this client.
  • acceptPut - Hints the PUT request formats accepted by the resource for this client.
  • acceptRanges - Hints the range-specifiers available to the client for this resource; equivalent to the Accept-Ranges HTTP response header [RFC7233].
  • acceptPrefer - Hints the preferences [RFC7240] supported by the resource. Note that, as per that specifications, a preference can be ignored by the server.
  • docs - Hints the location for human-readable documentation for the relation type of the resource.
  • preconditionRequired - Hints that the resource requires state-changing requests (e.g., PUT, PATCH) to include a precondition, as per [RFC7232], to avoid conflicts due to concurrent updates.
  • authSchemes- Hints that the resource requires authentication using the HTTP Authentication Framework [RFC7235].
  • status - Hints the status of the resource.

These hints provide you with a base set of the most commonly used sets of information, but then there is also a HTTP resource hint registration where all hints are registered. Hints can be added, allowing for the addition of custom defined hints, providing additional information beforehand about what can be expected from a resource link included as part of a JSON Home index. It is a much more sophisticated approach describing the behaviors of links than we included in APIs.json, with the formal hint registry being very useful and well-defined.

I”d say that JSON Home has all the features for defining a single, or collections of APIs, but really reflects its roots in the web, and possesses a heavy focus on enabling action with each link. While this is part of the linking structure of APIs.json, I feel like the detail and the mandate for action around each resource in a JSON Home index is much stronger. I feel like JSON Home is in the same realm as Postman Collections, but when it comes to API discovery. I always feel like a Postman Collection is more transactional than OpenAPI is by default. There is definitely overlap, but Postman Collections always feels one or two step closer to some action being taken than OpenAPI does–I am guessing it is because of it’s client roots, similar to the web roots of JSON Home, and also OpenAPIs roots in documentation.

Ok. Yay! I have Pivio, and now JSON Home both loaded in my brain. I have a feel for what they are trying to accomplish, and have found some interesting layers I hadn’t considered while doing my APIs.json centered API discovery work. Now I can step back, and consider the features of all three of these API discovery formats, establish a rough Venn diagram of their features, and consider how they overlap, and compliment each other. I feel like we are moving towards an important time for API discovery, and with the growing number of APIs available we will see more investment in API discovery specifications, as well as services and tooling that help us with API discovery. I’ll keep working to understand what is going on, establish at least a general understanding of each API discovery specifications, and report back here about what is happening when I can.


Different Search Engines For API Discovery

I was learning about the microservices discovery specification Pivio, which is a schema for framing the conversation, but also an uploader, search, and web interface for managing a collection of microservices. I found their use of ElasticSearch as the search engine for their tooling worth thinking about more. When we first launched APIs.json, we created APIs.io as the search engine–providing a custom developed public API search engine. I hadn’t thought of using ElasticSearch as an engine for searching APIs.json treated as a JSON document.

Honestly, I have been relying on the Github API as the search engine for my API discovery. Using it to uncover not just APIs.json, but OpenAPI, API Blueprint, and other API specification formats. This works well for public discovery, but I could see ElasticSearch being a quick and dirty way to launch a private or public engine for an API discovery, catalog, directory, or type of collection. I will add ElasticSearch, and other platforms I track on as part of my API deployment research as a API discovery building block, evolving the approaches I’m tracking on.

It is easy to think of API discovery as directories like ProgrammableWeb, or marketplaces like Mashape, and public API search engines like APIs.io–someone else’s discovery vehicle, which you are allowed to drive when you need. However, when you begin to consider other types of API discovery search engines, you realize that a collection of API discovery documents like JSON Home, Pivio, and APIs.json can quickly become your own personal API discovery vehicle. I’m going to write a separate piece on how I use Github as my API discovery engine, then I think I’ll step back and look at other approaches to searching JSON or YAML documents to see if I can find any search engines that might be able to be fine tuned specifically for API discovery.


Microservice Discovery Using Pivio

404: Not Found


Enhancing Your API SEO

One question I’m regularly getting from my readers is regarding how you can increase the search engine optimization (SEO) for your APIs–yes, API SEO (acronyms rule)! While we should be investing in API discoverability by embracing hypermedia early on, I feel in its absence we should also be indexing our entire API operations with APIs.json, and making sure we describe individual APIs using OpenAPI, the world of web APIs is still very hitched to the web, making SEO very relevant when it comes to API discoverability.

While I was diving deeper into “The API Platform”, a VERY forward leaning API deployment and management solution, I was pleased to see another mention of API SEO using JSON-LD (scroll down on the page). While I wish every API would adopt JSON-LD for their overall design, I feel we are going to have to piece SEO and discoverability together for our sites, as The API platform demonstrates. They provide a nice example of how you can paste a JSON-LD script into the the page of your API documentation, helping amplify some of the meaning and intent behind your API using JSON-LD + Schema.org.

I have been thinking about Schema.org’s relationship to API discovery for some time now, which is something I’m hoping to get more time to invest in further during 2017. I’d like to see Schema.org get more baked into API design, deployment, and documentation, as well as JSON-LD as part of underlying schema. To help build a bridge from where we are at, to where we need to be going, I’m going to explore how I can leverage OpenAPI tags to help autogenerate JSON-LD Schema.org tags as part of API documentation. While I’d love for everyone to just get the benefits of JSON-LD, I’m afraid many folks won’t have the bandwidth, and could use an assist from the API documentation solutions they are already using–making APIs more SEO friendly by default.

If you are starting a new API I recommend playing with “The API Platform”, as you get the benefits of Schema.org, JSON-LD, and MANY other SIGNIFICANT API concepts by default. Out of all of the API frameworks I’ve evaluated as part of my API deployment research, “The API Platform” is by far the most advanced when it comes to leading by example, and enabling healthy API design practices by default–something that will continue to bring benefits across all stops along the life cycle if you put to work in your operations.


The Open Service Broker API

Jerome Louvel from Restlet introduced me to the Open Service Broker API the other day, a “project allows developers, ISVs, and SaaS vendors a single, simple, and elegant way to deliver services to applications running within cloud-native platforms such as Cloud Foundry, OpenShift, and Kubernetes. The project includes individuals from Fujitsu, Google, IBM, Pivotal, RedHat and SAP.”

Honestly, I only have so much cognitive capacity to understand everything I come across, so I pasted the link into my super secret Slack group for API super heroes to get additional opinions. My friend James Higginbotham (@launchany) quickly responded with, “if I understand correctly, this is a standard that would be equiv to Heroku’s Add-On API? Or am I misunderstanding? The Open Service Broker API is a clean abstraction that allows ‘services’ to expose a catalog of capabilities, as well as the ability to create, use and delete those services. Sounds like add-on support to me, but I could be wrong[…]But seems very much like vendor-to-vendor. Will be interesting to track.”

At first glance, I thought it was more of an aggregation and/or discovery solution, but I think James is right. It is an API scaffolding that SaaS platforms can plug into their platforms to broker other 3rd party API services. It allows any platform to offer an environment for extending your platform like Heroku does, as James points out. It is something that adds an API discovery dimension to the concept of offering up plugins, or I guess what could be an embedded API marketplace within your platform. Opening up wholesale and private label opportunities for API providers to sell their warez directly on other people’s platforms.

The concept really isn’t anything new. I remember developing document print plugins for Box back when I worked with the Mimeo print API in 2011. The Open Service Broker API is just looking to standardize this approach so hat API provider could bake in a set of 3rd party partner APIs directly into their platform. I’ve recently added a plugin area to my API research. I will add the Open Service Broker API as an organization within this research. I’m probably also going to add it to my API discovery research, and I’m even considering expanding it into an API marketplace section of my research. I can see add-on, plugin, marketplace, and API brokering like this grow into its own discipline, with a growing number of definitions, services, and tools to support.


Patent US9639404: API Matchmaking Using Feature Models

Here is another patent in my series of API related patents. I’d file this in the category as the other similar one from IBM–Patent US 8954988: Automated Assessment of Terms of Service in an API Marketplace. It is a good idea. I just don’t feel it is a good patent idea.

Title: API matchmaking using feature models Number: 09454409 Owner: International Business Machines Corporation Abstract: Software that uses machine logic based algorithms to help determine and/or prioritize an application programming interface’s (API) desirability to a user based on how closely the API’s terms of service (ToS) meet the users’ ToS preferences. The software performs the following steps: (i) receiving a set of API ToS feature information that includes identifying information for at least one API and respectively associated ToS features for each identified API; (ii) receiving ToS preference information that relates to ToS related preferences for a user; and (iii) evaluating a strength of a match between each respective API identified in the API ToS feature information set and the ToS preference information to yield a match value for each API identified in the API ToS feature information set. The ToS features include at least a first ToS field. At least one API includes multiple, alternative values in its first ToS field.

Honestly, I don’t have a problem with a company turning something like this into a feature, and even charging for it. I just wish IBM would help us solve the problem of making terms of service machine readable, so something like this is even possible. Could you imagine what would be possible if everybody’s terms of service were machine readable, and could be programmatically evaluated? We’d all be better off, and matchmaking services like this would become a viable service.

I just wish more of the energy I see go into these patent would be spent actually doing things in the API space. Providing low cost, innovative API services that businesses can use, instead of locking up ideas, filing them away with the government, so that they can be used at a later date in litigation and backdoor dealings.


Publishing Your API In The AWS Marketplace

I’ve been watching the conversation around how APIs are discovered since 2010 and I ave been working to understand where things might be going beyond ProgrammableWeb, to the Mashape Marketplace, and even investing in my own API discovery format APIs.json. It is a layer of the API space that feels very bipolar to me, with highs and lows, and a lot of meh in the middle. I do not claim to have “the solution” when it comes to API discovery and prefer just watching what is happening, and contributing where I can.

A number interesting signals for API deployment, as well as API discovery, are coming out of Amazon Marketplace lately. I find myself keeping a closer eye on the almost 350 API related solutions in the marketplace, and today I’m specifically taking notice of the Box API availability in the AWS Marketplace. I find this marketplace approach to not just API discovery via an API marketplace, but also API deployment very interesting. AWS isn’t just a marketplace of APIs, where you find what you need and integrate directly with that provider. It is where you find your API(s) and then spin up an instance within your AWS infrastructure that facilitates that API integration–a significant shift.

I’m interested in the coupling between API providers and AWS. AWS and Box have entered into a partnership, but their approach provides a possible blueprint for how this approach to API integration and deployment can scale. How tightly coupled each API provider chooses to be, looser (proxy calling the API), or tighter (deploying API as AMI), will vary from implementation to implementation, but the model is there. The Box AWS Marketplace instance dependencies on the Box platform aren’t evident to me, but I’m sure they can easily be quantified, and something I can get other API providers to make sure and articulate when publishing their API solutions to AWS Marketplace.

AWS is moving towards earlier visions I’ve had of selling wholesale editions of an API, helping you manage the on-premise and private label API contracts for your platform, and helping you explore the economics of providing wholesale editions of your platforms, either tightly or loosely coupled with AWS infrastructure. Decompiling your API platform into small deployable units of value that can be deployed within a customer’s existing AWS infrastructure, seamlessly integrating with existing AWS services.

I like where Box is going with their AWS partnership. I like how it is pushing forward the API conversation when it comes to using AWS infrastructure, and specifically the marketplace. I’ll keep an eye on where things are going. Box seems to be making all the right moves lately by going all in on the OpenAPI Spec, and decompiling their API platform making it deployable and manageable from the cloud, but also much more modular and usable in a serverless way. Providing us all with one possible blueprint for how we handle the technology and business of our API operations in the clouds.


The APIs.json For Trade.gov

There are a growing number of API providers who have published an APIs.json for their API operations, providing a machine-readable index of not just their API, but for their API entire operations. My favorite example to use in my talks and conversations when I’m showcasing the API discovery format is the one for the International Trade Administration at developer.trade.gov.

The International Trade Administration (ITA) is the government agency that “strengthens the competitiveness of U.S. industry, promotes trade and investment, and ensures fair trade through the rigorous enforcement of our trade laws and agreements”, provides an index of where you can find their developer portal, documentation, terms of service, as well as a machine readable OpenAPI for their trade APIs.

I couldn’t think of a more shining example of APIs when it comes to talking about the API economy. I am pleased to have helped influenced their API efforts and helping them see the importance of providing a machine readable index of their API operations with APIs.json, as well as their APIs using OpenAPI. If you need a well maintained, and meaningful example of how APIs.json works head over to developer.trade.gov and take a look.


The List Of API Signals I Track On In My API Stack Research

I keep an eye on several thousand companies as part of my research into the API space and publish over a thousand of these profiles in my API Stack project. Across the over 1,100 companies, organizations, institutions, and government agencies I'm regularly running into a growing number of signals that tune me into what is going on with each API provider, or service provider. 

Here are the almost 100 types of signals I am tuning into as I keep an eye on the world of APIs, each contributing to my unique awareness of what is going on with everything API.

  • Account Settings (x-account-settings) - Does an API provider allow me to manage the settings for my account?
  • Android SDK (x-android-sdk) - Is there an Android SDK present?
  • Angular (x-angularjs) - Is there an Angular SDK present?
  • API Explorer (x-api-explorer) - Does a provider have an interactive API explorer?
  • Application Gallery (x-application-gallery) - Is there a gallery of applications build on an API available?
  • Application Manager (x-application-manager) - Does the platform allow me to management my APIs?
  • Authentication Overview (x-authentication-overview) - Is there a page dedicated to educating users about authentication?
  • Base URL for API (x-base-url-for-api) - What is the base URL(s) for the API?
  • Base URL for Portal (x-base-url-for-portal) - What is the base URL for the developer portal?
  • Best Practices (x-best-practices) - Is there a page outlining best practices for integrating with an API?
  • Billing history (x-billing-history) - As a developer, can I get at the billing history for my API consumption?
  • Blog (x-blog) - Does the API have a blog, either at the company level, but preferably at the API and developer level as well?
  • Blog RSS Feed (x-blog-rss-feed) - Is there an RSS feed for the blog?
  • Branding page (x-branding-page) - Is there a dedicated branding page as part of API operations?
  • Buttons (x-buttons) - Are there any embeddable buttons available as part of API operations.
  • C# SDK (x-c-sharp) - Is there a C# SDK present?
  • Case Studies (x-case-studies) - Are there case studies available, showcasing implementations on top of an API?
  • Change Log (x-change-log) - Does a platform provide a change log?
  • Chrome Extension (x-chrome-extension) - Does a platform offer up open-source or white label chrome extensions?
  • Code builder (x-code-builder) - Is there some sort of code generator or builder as part of platform operations?
  • Code page (x-code-page) - Is there a dedicated code page for all the samples, libraries, and SDKs?
  • Command Line Interface (x-command-line-interface) - Is there a command line interface (CLI) alongside the API?
  • Community Supported Libraries (x-community-supported-libraries) - Is there a page or section dedicated to code that is developed by the API and developer community?
  • Compliance (x-compliance) - Is there a section dedicated to industry compliance?
  • Contact form (x-contact-form) - Is there a contact form for getting in touch?
  • Crunchbase (x-crunchbase) - Is there a Crunchbase profile for an API or its company?
  • Dedicated plans pricing page (x-dedicated-plans--pricing-page)
  • Deprecation policy (x-deprecation-policy) - Is there a page dedicated to deprecation of APIs?
  • Developer Showcase (x--developer-showcase) - Is there a page that showcases API developers?
  • Documentation (x-documentation) - Where is the documentation for an API?
  • Drupal (x-drupal) - Is there Drupal code, SDK, or modules available for an API?
  • Email (x-email) - Is an email address available for a platform?
  • Embeddable page (x-embeddable-page) - Is there a page of embeddable tools available for a platform?
  • Error response codes (x-error-response-codes) - Is there a listing or page dedicated to API error responses?
  • Events (x-events) - Is there a calendar of events related to platform operations?
  • Facebook (x-facebook) - Is there a Facebook page available for an API?
  • Faq (x-faq) - Is there an FAQ section available for the platform?
  • Forum (x-forum) - Does a provider have a forum for support and asynchronous conversations?
  • Forum rss (x-forum-rss) - If there is a forum, does it have an RSS feed?
  • Getting started (x-getting-started) - Is there a getting started page for an API?
  • Github (x-github) - Does a provider have a Github account for the API or company?
  • Glossary (x-glossary) - Is there a glossary of terms available for a platform?
  • Heroku (x-heroku) - Are there Heroku SDKs, or deployment solutions?
  • How-To Guides (x-howto-guides) - Does a provider offer how-to guides as part of operations?
  • Interactive documentation (x-interactive-documentation) - Is there interactive documentation available as part of operatoins?
  • IoS SDK (x-ios-sdk) - Is there an IoS SDK for Objective-C or Swift?
  • Issues (x-issues) - Is there an issue management page or repo for the platform?
  • Java SDK (x-java) - Is there a Java SDK for the platform?
  • JavaScript API (x-javascript-api) - Is there a JavaScript SDK available for a platform?
  • Joomla (x-joomla) - Is there Joomla plug for the platform?
  • Knowledgebase (x-knowledgebase) - Is there a knowledgebase for the platform?
  • Labs (x-labs) - Is there a labs environment for the API platform?
  • Licensing (x-licensing) - Is there licensing for the API, schema, and code involved?
  • Message Center (x-message-center) - Is there a messaging center available for developers?
  • Mobile Overview (x-mobile-overview) - Is there a section or page dedicated to mobile applications?
  • Node.js (x-nodejs) - Is there a Node.js SDK available for the API?
  • Oauth Scopes (x-oauth-scopes) - Does a provider offer details on the available OAuth scopes?
  • Openapi spec (x-openapi-spec) - Is there an OpenAPI available for the API?
  • Overview (x-overview) - Does a platform have a simple, concise description of what they do?
  • Paid support plans (x-paid-support-plans) - Are there paid support plans available for a platform?
  • Postman Collections (x-postman) - Are there any Postman Collections available?
  • Partner (x-partner) - Is there a partner program available as part of API operations?
  • Phone (x-phone) - Does a provider publish a phone number?
  • PHP SDK (x-php) - Is there a PHP SDK available for an API?
  • Privacy Policy (x-privacy-policy-page) - Does a platform have a privacy policy?
  • PubSub (x-pubsubhubbub) - Does a platform provide a PubSub feed?
  • Python SDK (x-python) - Is there a Python SDK for an API?
  • Rate Limiting (x-rate-limiting) - Does a platform provide information on API rate limiting?
  • Real Time Solutions (x-real-time-page) - Are there real-time solutions available as part of the platform?
  • Road Map (x-road-map) - Does a provider share their roadmap publicly?
  • Ruby SDK (x-ruby) - Is there a Ruby SDK available for the API?
  • Sandbox (x-sandbox) - Is there a sandbox for the platform?
  • Security (x-security) - Does a platform provide an overview of security practices?
  • Self-Service registration (x-self-service-registration) - Does a platform allow for self-service registration?
  • Service Level Agreement (x-service-level-agreement) - Is an SLA available as part of platform integration?
  • Slideshare (x-slideshare) - Does a provider publish talks on Slideshare?
  • Stack Overflow (x-stack-overflow) - Does a provider actively use Stack Overflow as part of platform operations?
  • Starter Projects (x-starter-projects) - Are there start projects available as part of platform operations?
  • Status Dashboard (x-status-dashboard) - Is there a status dashboard available as part of API operations.
  • Status History (x-status-history) - Can you get at the history involved with API operations?
  • Status RSS (x-status-rss) - Is there an RSS feed available as part of the platform status dashboard?
  • Support Page (x-support-overview-page) - Is there a page or section dedicated to support?
  • Terms of Service (x-terms-of-service-page) - Is there a terms of service page?
  • Ticket System (x-ticket-system) - Does a platform offer a ticketing system for support?
  • Tour (x-tour) - Is a tour available to walk a developer through platforms operations?
  • Trademarks (x-trademarks) - Is there details about trademarks, and how to use them?
  • Twitter (x-twitter) - Does a platform have a Twitter account dedicated to the API or even company?
  • Videos (x-videos) - Is there a page, YouTube, or other account dedicated to videos about the API?
  • Webhooks (x-webhook) - Are there webhooks available for an API?
  • Webinars (x-webinars) - Does an API conduct webinars to support operations?
  • White papers (x-white-papers) - Does a platform provide white papers as part of operations?
  • Widgets (x-widgets) - Are there widgets available for use as part of integration?
  • Wordpress (x-wordpress) - Are there WordPress plugins or code available?

There are hundreds of other building blocks I track on as part of API operations, but this list represents the most common, that often have dedicated URLs available for exploring, and have the most significant impact on API integrations. You'll notice there is an x- representation for each one, which I use as part of APIs.json indexes for all the APIs I track on. Some of these signal types are machine readable like OpenAPIs or a Blog RSS, with others machine readable because there is another API behind, like Twitter or Github, but most of them are just static pages, where a human (me) can visit and stay in tune with signals.

I have two primary objectives with this work: 1) identify the important signals, that impact integration, and will keep me and my readers in tune with what is going on, and 2) identify the common channels, and help move the more important ones to be machine-readable, allowing us to scale the monitoring of important signals like pricing and terms of service. My API Stack research provides me wit a nice listing of APIs, as well as more individualized stacks like Microsoft, Google, Microsoft, and Facebook, or even industry stacks like SMS, Email, and News. It also provides me with a wealth of signals we can tune into better understand the scope and health of the API sector, and any individual business vertical that is being touched by APIs.


If you think there is a link I should have listed here feel free to tweet it at me, or submit as a Github issue. Even though I do this full time, I'm still a one person show, and I miss quite a bit, and depend on my network to help me know what is going on.